Friday, May 26, 2017

How to ask questions

A very important skill to learn. We can't communicate in any language without asking questions. 

Today we go back to the BBC's "Learning English" and turn to the "Lower-Intermediate" section. We're going to meet three new friends: Alice, Amith and Sophie.

Watch the video, and then do the activities. I'm very interested in your answers to the 7-question quiz: What do you know about our presenters?

Please post your answers on the Tag Board opposite, or in a comment. An aperitivo for the first reader to get all the questions correct!

Stay tuned! and I look forward to your answers.
Yours,
Mike

Exercise and the brain: the answers:

Hello everyone! After rather a long time, here are the answers to our previous quiz:

1. How does Neil regard the quality of his own mind? He doesn't think he's very sharp.

Extra question: What's the opposite of "sharp" when you are talking about someone's mind?

2. Which two countries did he do a "stint" in? Japan and the Czech Republic


3. And what do you imagine he was doing there? Teaching? Journalism? He doesn't actually say.

And the correct verb?

There's a verb we use to mean 'start doing exercise'. Is it…
a) take up is correct.
b) take on
c) take over

Note that these verbs form part of that vast collection of "phrasal verbs", also called "multi-word" verbs. By changing the word coming after the verb, known as the "particle", you can completely change the meaning of the verb.

And now for our next activity. This is aimed at 'Lower Intermediate'. Come in and take part!

More soon,
Yours,
Mike

Tuesday, May 02, 2017

Listening: exercise and the brain

Hello everyone. What follows is a somewhat advanced listening exercise, probably at least Council of Europe B2 level and above.

But don't let this put you off. You'll learn some useful vocabulary here, as well as some valuable advice.

It's on the BBC "Learning English" site, in the News review section. It's about some recent research which shows that regular exercise not only develops your body, but also your mind.

Among other expressions, you'll learn the meaning of "sharp", "keep (something) at bay" and "stint".

So now surf over to the BBC's "Learning English - News review", watch the interview and do the activities.

Here are two extra questions:

1. How does Neil regard the quality of his own mind?
2. Which two countries did he do a "stint" in?
3. And what do you imagine he was doing there?

Post your answers in a Comment or on the Tag Board. Also, say how easy or difficult you found this listening. 

Come in, all you readers!

Follow-up later this week.

All the best,
Mike